Visit the Corrales Harvest Festival website these days, seeking to know if and when and what, you will encounter a jaunty bit of poetry which begins thusly:

“This Covid thing has just been terrible,
We keep to ourselves, it’s been unbearable.
But taking a peek on the brighter side,
There is a way to have fun and keep our stride.

Webbing and Zooming are the methods of choice,
We can connect to the Village and have a voice.
Some things may be cancelled, some reticking,
But by golly the Harvest Festival is alive and kicking…

Festival board member Cookie Emerson wrote that, and it does indeed sum up the perky and still germinating approach to the festival, scheduled for September 26 and 27. “But not really,” explains Tony Messec, who had thought that in 2020 he was going to bask in the accrued success of the Festival under his guidance the last few years. “We have no head this year, just the seven of us on the Board.” Messec knew he would be leaving CHF better than when he got deeply involved, “But then we were hit by this buzz saw of a pandemic.”

So, the festival will proceed almost entirely remotely/virtually, over a period of 16 to 17 days, starting no later than the last week in September. And the board is hopeful to put together six events—“though four of six would still be a victory,” as Messec put it, given the complexity of Zooming or YouTube-ing the festival. The first will be a compendium of videos put together by Casa San Ysidro’s site manager, Aaron Gardner. The museum, which houses a collection of rare artifacts in a historic adobe home and multi-acre setting, typically welcomes over 2,000 people within the two day festival period.

This year visitors can take a virtual tour of Casa San Ysidro and learn of the house’s history, architecture, and collection. 360-degree views of each space are featured. In another video, you can also watch blacksmith Dave Sabo work the forge, as he describes some of the early iron manufacturing and blacksmithing practices in New Mexico.

And you can observe methods of prepping, cooking, and baking in a traditional Pueblo horno. In addition, actress, singer, and traditional storyteller Rosalia Pocheco retells the traditional cuentos of The Magical Pairs, The Lion and the Bee, Tia the Tortilla, and La Llorona. And heritage artists will be showcased, along with their wares, including retablos, bultos, encrusted straw crafts, tinwork, pottery, colchas and jewelry.

Also, you can take lessons, one on Pueblo agriculture by former Isleta Albuquerque Museum docent, Rosalee Lucero, who shares her experiences growing up on the Pueblo and working in the fields. Another video lesson focuses on the history of architecture in New Mexico, from Pueblo, to Spanish, and early American architecture, explained through Casa’s own buildings and collection.

Next, thanks to the efforts of Tracy Stabenow, a pet mayor competition, and, thirdly, a pet parade, somehow. The theme of the parade is “First Responders,” which cleverly allows for pet persons actually to walk along garbed in shower curtains, masks, and plastic gloves, while their critters are similarly attired. Except maybe for the guineau pig, a recent nominee, who may be too tiny for much in the way of attire. To nominate your pet, see http://www.corralesharvestfestival.com/2020-pet-mayoral-election/. Thus far there are no details posted about the parade itself.

Fourth in the rotation is a virtual hayride, which Messec hopes will include an actual hay wagon touring Corrales, interspersed with old photographs of the buildings, streets, sites, the wagon is passing. A pumpkin carving competition takes up slot number five, particularly aimed at kids, with prizes involved. In fact, remote visitors are likely to be invited to cast their votes, at $1 per, much in the manner of the pet mayor event.

Finally, the non-Hootenanny. No dancing, no booze. Possibly a taped musical event viewed from cars, possibly at the Balloon Fiesta field which already is equipped with a drive in theater, or, something else. Kyle Martin, last year’s performer, may be on the roster. His music, per his definition: “Highly amplified western themed honkytonk style music played in a hard rock format with a heavy beat.” Likely not live, however.

The 2019 festival raised about $20,000 which was doled out to local organizations. The 2020 version may generate $5,000, with any luck, and, as Messec points out, “it won’t cost us much to put together.” No stage, no kids’ climbing wall and similar.  No poster art contest, no new T-shirts for sale, either —“we don’t make any money on these anyway,” said Messec.

As for volunteers, which usually comprise many, many Corraleños, techies indeed are welcome to get involved. Contact Messec at tonym505@aol.com

Will this year’s festival attract virtually the two/thirds of non-Corrales people usually arriving via Corrales Road the end of September? Quién sabe?

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